Artifact Reflection Title: Easter Lesson Plan, Leveled Literacy Intervention Date: Spring Semester 2012 Description of Artifact My first artifact is an Easter lesson plan that I taught to my two year olds. I read them a flip book, which they helped me with as I read the story. I followed up with some questions for them after I was done with the ... Examine reflection notations and logs. Conduct professional reflective conversations during post observation conferences, i.e. “Tell me how you felt about the lesson.”, “What were you observing during your teaching?”, “Can you tell me what was different about yesterday’s lesson?” Model the practice that recognizes how we can all ... Reflection – A Key to Professional Development Professional Development The words evaluate and observe seem to have taken on a negative connotation in the education world when it comes to teacher evaluation . The reflection lists location, date, and title of training, workshop, or other professional development experience student is documenting. The reflection lists name of presenters and their professional credentials. The reflection includes detailed description of workshop content, including but not limited to, the purpose, The integration of reflection is used to support learning objectives and professional development (Casey & Clark 2009). As I progress in my career, artefacts will be used as evidence to support my reflections. DOMAIN #4 – PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITES Addresses a teacher’s additional professional responsibilities, included self-assessment and reflect, communication with parents, participating in ongoing professional development, and contributing to the school and district environment. Framework Guidelines Artifacts/Actions to Illustrate Proficiency Legacy Artifact Reflection Prompts. What? Briefly summarize what the artifact is and the context (e.g. didactic course, introductory pharmacy practice experience) in which it was created. So What? Explain how this artifact represents evidence of learning in this outcome area. Now What?

Reflection: This was another assignment that was assigned to me during my Practicum 4 class. For his assignment I was asked to collect artifacts and records from one child in the classroom. Artifacts and observations of them meeting goals and developmental standards. I chose an artifact from the in-service I attended in the district where I am having my semester long practicum experience. The in-service was held for teachers to meet state mandated professional development requirements regarding bullying and child abuse. I was able to attend this professional development in-service along DOMAIN #4 – PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITES Addresses a teacher’s additional professional responsibilities, included self-assessment and reflect, communication with parents, participating in ongoing professional development, and contributing to the school and district environment. Framework Guidelines Artifacts/Actions to Illustrate Proficiency Possible Artifacts for Danielson Domains One and Four Educator Effectiveness Pilot Network April 2014 Note: Educators will provide artifacts as evidence for Domains 1 and 4. These are the ‘behind the scenes’ components, typically not observable in a classroom setting. Evidence for Domains 2 and 3 will be collected - Specific examples of reflection from the lesson - Ability to articulate strengths and areas for development - Capture student voice (survey, conversation w/ students) - Varied data sources (observation data, parent feedback, evaluator feedback, peer feedback, student work, assessment results) - Accurate reflections on a lesson Reflection: The step that makes a portfolio more than just a collection of work. As you move through your education, experiences will begin to present themselves that cause you to reconsider your perspective, change your mind, or deepen your understanding. Reflection is not an 'add-on' piece to your learning process, portfolio, or teaching practice. It is integral to the complex process of becoming an art teacher. Successful reflection enables self-awareness, personal and professional growth and improved teaching practices. Reflection may be accomplished individually and collectively.

In addition, please provide a reflection sheet on your growth/development in this area between the two timepoints. Artifact B : Mission Statements Introduction to who you are as a person and a professional (text, pictures, video) that includes your narrative personal and professional mission statements (two different mission statements). Artifact Instructions Artifact A: Resume Development (1-2 page for reflection) Polished resume, along with the one submitted with your application to the SDA program. In addition, please provide a reflection sheet on your growth/development in this area between the two time points. Reflecting on professional reading, listening and/or viewing Individual professional learning activities such as professional reading, listening and viewing contribute towards meeting your professional development requirements by enabling you to learn in your own time. The goal of the Massachusetts public K-12 education system is to prepare all students for success after high school. Massachusetts public school students are leading the nation in reading and math and are at the top internationally in reading, science, and math according to the national NAEP and international PISA assessments.

Reflection: The step that makes a portfolio more than just a collection of work. As you move through your education, experiences will begin to present themselves that cause you to reconsider your perspective, change your mind, or deepen your understanding. - Specific examples of reflection from the lesson - Ability to articulate strengths and areas for development - Capture student voice (survey, conversation w/ students) - Varied data sources (observation data, parent feedback, evaluator feedback, peer feedback, student work, assessment results) - Accurate reflections on a lesson Reflecting on professional reading, listening and/or viewing Individual professional learning activities such as professional reading, listening and viewing contribute towards meeting your professional development requirements by enabling you to learn in your own time. Professional Evaluation Portfolio – Basics and Beyond •Development of Portfolio takes time and personal reflection –Be Selective. It’s quality not quantity! •It [s a Living, Working Document – save evidence –Should you submit artifacts as they are collected? –Check with your individual supervisor (e.g. TS has separate email Professional evelopent Portfolio uide Step 1: Professional Self-Reflection Purpose In this step consider what external factors or trends are affecting your professional practice. The outcomes are your short-term (1 to 3 years) and long-term (3 to 5 years) goals. Reflect on where you are in your career and where you would like to be in the future.

- Specific examples of reflection from the lesson - Ability to articulate strengths and areas for development - Capture student voice (survey, conversation w/ students) - Varied data sources (observation data, parent feedback, evaluator feedback, peer feedback, student work, assessment results) - Accurate reflections on a lesson Creating Online Professional Development for Educators 1 Teacher Evaluation Using the Danielson Framework 6. A Professional Portfolio: ‘Artifact Party’ A. Using Artifacts to Help Determine Performance Levels Artifact Party Guidelines CHARLOTTE DANIELSON: Of course, Domains 1 and 4 are behind the scenes Legacy Artifact Reflection Prompts. What? Briefly summarize what the artifact is and the context (e.g. didactic course, introductory pharmacy practice experience) in which it was created. So What? Explain how this artifact represents evidence of learning in this outcome area. Now What?

Samsung galaxy s6 als afstandsbediening.pl

portfolios (N=28) were analyzed. Each documentation portfolio included artifact sections related to instructional leadership (tasks related to program evaluation, program implementation, classroom observation, job shadowing/professional development), and managerial tasks (meetings and activities related to discipline, facilities, budgets, and portfolios (N=28) were analyzed. Each documentation portfolio included artifact sections related to instructional leadership (tasks related to program evaluation, program implementation, classroom observation, job shadowing/professional development), and managerial tasks (meetings and activities related to discipline, facilities, budgets, and Description of Artifact For my Research Artifact Reflection Summary, I wish to discuss a group assignment that I completed in Evaluative Research in Social Work Planning and Administration (SW-8953) class taken during the fall semester of 2016 with Instructor Hsun-Ta Hsu, and his teaching assistant, Jung Sim Jun. The Reflection Process Becoming a reflective practitioner requires time, practice, and an environment supportive to the development and organization of the reflection process. This is a highly individualized process and the licensure candidate should find the structure and method of reflection that best suits him or her.

Artifact reflection sheet for professional development

Poly sheeting for greenhouses
Andy williams where do i begin piano sheet
Calcul capitalisation semestrielle

Teacher Generated Examples of Artifacts and Evidence ... • assignment logs / grade sheet • learning reflection form ... • professional development log Oct 01, 2014 · Portfolio Artifact Suggestions This is a living document and will be updated periodically. This is not a complete list but some suggestions. If you have any questions, please consult your supervisor. INTASC Standards Artifact Suggestions The Learner and Learning Standard #1: Learner Development: The teacher understands how learners grow CESA 4 Possible Artifacts for EP Standards 1, 2, 4 and 6 Standard Possible Artifacts Standard 1: Professional Knowledge The teacher demonstrates an understanding of the curriculum, subject content, and diverse needs of students by providing meaningful learning experiences. Indicators: 1.1 Effectively addresses appropriate curriculum standards. EXAMPLES of ARTIFACTS Note: This is a brainstormed list of possible artifacts. Teachers should use artifacts that are reflective of their own work. The following are examples ONLY and not meant to provide an exhaustive list. ! TESS Examples of ARTIFACTS! 4! Revised 12/17/2013 ! Domain 4: Professional Responsibility a. Reflecting on Teaching The Reflection Process Becoming a reflective practitioner requires time, practice, and an environment supportive to the development and organization of the reflection process. This is a highly individualized process and the licensure candidate should find the structure and method of reflection that best suits him or her. I chose an artifact from the in-service I attended in the district where I am having my semester long practicum experience. The in-service was held for teachers to meet state mandated professional development requirements regarding bullying and child abuse. I was able to attend this professional development in-service along